Tag: native plants

Garden Smarter: Grow this not that

At this virtual and in=person event, learn what beneficial plants to use instead of invasives. Our gardens may have invasive plants that are not helping the environment. Native plants to provide shelter and food for wildlife, do not require fertilizers, use less water, provide diversity and help prevent erosion. Learn what natives are available instead of the invasive plants.

To register and for more information

Tags: ,

volunteers neededChesapeake Natives is a nonprofit native plant nursery located in Rosaryville State Park in Upper Marlboro, Maryland dedicated to promoting, protecting, and propagating plants native to the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.

Volunteers are needed to help with various overwintering projects at the nursery in the new year. This is a great opportunity to learn about local eco-type native plant species.

Sign up here | Questions? Contact volunteer@chesapeakenatives.org

Tags: , ,

volunteers neededChesapeake Natives is a nonprofit native plant nursery located in Rosaryville State Park in Upper Marlboro, Maryland dedicated to promoting, protecting, and propagating plants native to the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.

Volunteers are needed to help with various overwintering projects at the nursery in the new year. This is a great opportunity to learn about local eco-type native plant species.

Sign up here | Questions? Contact volunteer@chesapeakenatives.org

Tags: , ,

anne arundel county watershed stewards academyanne arundel county public libraryPresented by the Watershed Stewards Academy and the Anne Arundel County Public Library. Did you know fall is the best time to bring new native plants into your yard? Join Steward and local native plant expert Alison Milligan for a fun discussion about native plants, and learn why they’re essential to restoring the health of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.

Register here

Tags: , , , ,

create a new climate for action

Climate change is causing a biodiversity crisis as habitats shrink and become degraded. Why does this matter and what can we do to protect & restore the biodiversity on which we all depend? How will it help to conserve 30% of the nation’s land by 2030, and what can you do in your own yard to be a biodiversity booster? Register.

Sara Via, Ph.D., Professor and Climate Extension Specialist at the University of Maryland College Park, is once again offering free webinars on issues related to Climate Change. Learn more about Dr. Via and the 2021 lectures. Webinars are free, and will be held every other Wednesday. Register for as many as you like. All registrants will be sent a link to the video soon after each webinar.

Tags: , , , ,

here we grow logo

homestead gardens

Annapolis Green is partnering with Founding 100 supporter Homestead Gardens in an exciting three-part spring gardening seminar series. The third is Here We Grow: Beautiful & Delicious!

Topics covered: Companion planting and the relationship between flowers and veggies for a truly Beautiful & Delicious garden!

Beautiful & Delicious!

Let’s celebrate beautiful and delicious gardens everywhere! Join Annapolis Green’s Here We Grow initiative… a modern-day Victory Garden initiative to encourage people to value the land and Nature by installing, developing or updating front yard gardens to provide beauty, food, and pollinator habitat everywhere you can! Meeting Annapolis Green’s overall organizational mission, this program resonates with many people who are gardening and cooking. Together, let’s get excited about the bounty of a summer garden, share ideas, tips and tricks.

Speakers: 

anna chaneyhoney's harvest farm logoAnna Chaney – Anna is a CPA, entrepreneur, certified in Permaculture Theory and Design, Regenerative Agriculture Farmer, Herbalist and Shamanic Energy Healer. She founded, owns, and operates a local catering and event company located at an eco-lifestyle marina resort on the Chesapeake Bay. She and her family have preserved over 1500 acres in agricultural and historic preservation in Anne Arundel County and Northern Calvert County. She lives on and care-takes a 160-acre permaculture farm, Honey’s Harvest, located in Lothian, Maryland, where she and her son grow and produce native fruits and nuts, and make herbal plant-based tinctures and syrups. Their focus is healing the soil; which feeds the plants and nourishes the people. She is dedicated to growing nutrient dense food and medicine for people: “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.” 

heather wheatleyHeather Wheatley – Homestead Gardens’ Educational Coordinator, Heather is also a certified Chesapeake Bay landscape professional and certified professional horticulturalist. Heather’s immense knowledge of our landscape will help anyone, novice or pro, get the most out of the soil and provide guidance on what to plant that will thrive. Her personal and professional mission is to proliferate the art and science of real and sustainable horticulture. She has expertise in plant selection, production, and trial installations in green roofing, green walls, and pollinator/beneficial meadow-scaping.

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

here we grow logo

homestead gardensAnnapolis Green is partnering with Founding 100 supporter Homestead Gardens in an exciting three-part spring gardening seminar series. The second is Here We Grow: Helping Essential Pollinators Thrive

Topics covered

  • Why pollinators (bees, bats, beetles, moths and more) are key to our food supply: No bees, no food!
  • Pesticide and habitat threats to pollinators
  • How what you plant makes a difference to pollinator health: Plant Native!
  • Homestead Gardens’ Native Habitat Center

Speakers

central maryland beekeepers associationLuke Goembel, Vice President of the Central Maryland Beekeepers Association.
Born and raised in Baltimore, Dr. Goembel is a graduate of Baltimore Polytechnic Institute. He won a National Academy of Sciences award to study space science at NASA after earning a Ph.D. in chemistry from Johns Hopkins and founded his own aerospace business in 1997 where he designed and built space science instrumentation for NASA and others. In 2009 he began beekeeping. After a devastating year for his bees, he investigated the reasons for the sudden deaths of his bees and from that time forward has devoted effort to studying and advocating for pollinator health. He has authored articles in American Bee Journal, and has given testimony in support of  pollinator-protecting bills in the Maryland General Assembly including a State-wide regulatory ban on the pesticide ranked second in causing pollinator deaths. He has served as a panelist at a Congressional briefing in D.C., and has spoken at the White House Council on Environmental Quality. Dr. Goembel volunteers his time and has not received one cent from either side on the issue of pollinators and pesticides.

Kathy Jentz, Editor, Publisher and Founder of Washington Gardener Magazine.
Kathy is a life-long gardener from a family of farmers and dedicated gardeners. Currently, she is President of the Silver Spring Garden Club and on the board of several other clubs and organizations, including GardenComm, the association for Garden Communicators. She is a proud member of One Montgomery Green ( a sister organization to Annapolis Green) and Washington Gardener Magazine is  a gold-level certified business in Green America.

Register to attend

More about our Here We Grow program, a modern-day Victory Garden concept.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

here we grow logo

Annapolis Green is partnering with Founding 100 supporter Homestead Gardens in an exciting three-part spring gardening seminar series. The first, Here We Grow: Planting Resilient Species, on March 24, will kick off Annapolis Green’s Here We Grow program. It will focus on understanding the soil and planting for our region.

Speakers include:

  • Heather Wheatley of Homestead Gardens is a Certified Chesapeake Bay landscape professional and certified professional horticulturist. Heather’s immense knowledge of our landscape will help anyone–novice or pro–get the most out of the soil and provide guidance on what plants will thrive.
  • Josh Clark, Landscape Architect, Restoration Coordinator with Anne Arundel County’s Watershed Stewards Academy (WSA), and Chesapeake Bay Landscape Professional, will discuss WSA’s Replant Anne Arundel program, the mission behind the initiative, and how to get involved. Josh will also share his favorite native resilient species.

Information and registration

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

WSA 10th annual conference banner

anne arundel county watershed stewards academyAnne Arundel County Watershed Stewards Academy’s 10th annual conference, Spring into Action, will be held virtually over two days.

March 5 – 9 am – 1:30 pm
March 6 – 9 am – noon

Session topics include:

  • Innovative & Equitable Stormwater Design
  • Grant Funding
  • Inventive Community Outreach
  • The State of Anne Arundel County Waterways
  • Invasive Plant Removal
  • Native Plant Solutions
  • Local Government Connections

The Keynote Address, Going and Growing in a World of Clouds, will be presented  by Dr. Mamie Parker, former Assistant Director for the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, executive coach, facilitator, transformational speaker, and founder of MA Parker and Associates.

The conference is open to the general public.

More information and to register

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

WSA 10th annual conference banner

anne arundel county watershed stewards academyAnne Arundel County Watershed Stewards Academy’s 10th annual conference, Spring into Action, will be held virtually over two days.

March 5 – 9 am – 1:30 pm
March 6 – 9 am – noon

Session topics include:

  • Innovative & Equitable Stormwater Design
  • Grant Funding
  • Inventive Community Outreach
  • The State of Anne Arundel County Waterways
  • Invasive Plant Removal
  • Native Plant Solutions
  • Local Government Connections

The Keynote Address, Going and Growing in a World of Clouds, will be presented  by Dr. Mamie Parker, former Assistant Director for the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, executive coach, facilitator, transformational speaker, and founder of MA Parker and Associates.

The conference is open to the general public.

More information and to register

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

annapolis green reads

by Karen Grumbles

You know the experiences where you are walking through a nature area and you hear the sounds of many birds, see all the different bugs skittering around on the ground and the strikingly beautiful butterflies fluttering around above the shrubs? We all tend to gravitate to places like Quiet Waters Park and Jug Bay Natural Area just for those kinds of experiences. Annapolis Green Reads Book Group picked Doug Tallamy’s Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants for its October read so that we can all learn how to bring that wildlife to our own yards and community spaces.

bringing nature home bookcover

Doug Tallamy talks about how we need many more of those spaces and that they need to be all around us in order to truly have a healthy, functioning ecosystem. He is a scientist, a specialist in entomology, with some important knowledge to impart.

He has studied the relationship of particular plants to insects, caterpillars, and butterflies to see which ones use the plants for food and for habitat. The insects as food source then beckon the birds and reptiles and other mammals to take up residence. He introduces us to a variety of native plants that are best for this ecosystem and even identifies “keystone” plants, those that benefit the largest variety of critters. As one member of the group said, “Everybody should have at least one oak tree in their yard.”

A memorable lesson from the book is that plants that are not native are frequently useless to the insects that we need for a healthy ecosystem. The reason that the beautiful Crepe Myrtles stay looking so pristine all year round is because no insects are using them for food. Ditto for the Norway Maple and the Bradford Pear tree. Why would we want to give our precious yard space to plants that serve no purpose in the environment?

The obvious response is that they are pretty. As we think through this some more, it starts to get really interesting because as the saying goes, “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.” We start thinking about who decides what constitutes ‘pretty’ in our urban and suburban yards? Is there a native plant that might be just as attractive as the non-native one we’ve been thinking about getting? We could even ask, ”Does the wildlife see these non-native plants as attractive?” because we really aren’t a keystone species for sustaining a healthy environment, other than fixing what we’ve broken.

In our book group, we all seem to have an appreciation for Tallamy’s perspective on the ecosystem. Humans have destroyed natural spaces and he provides the fundamentals for how to bring those spaces back and build a healthy ecosystem by starting with planting natives.

The second half of this book is a useful reference resource with native plants matched to the insects they attract. We discussed whether landscape gardeners are educated on this approach and what other resources are available*, that incentives for communities to plant natives might make a difference, and the importance and challenge of removing invasive species such as the dreaded phragmites and Japanese stiltgrass.

Tallamy has a new book out entitled Nature’s Best Hope that gives some practical steps on how to improve the spaces around us with native plants as a grassroots effort. It’s on our list of possible feature reads.

If you’d like to be included in our book group, please contact me. We would like to meet at Old Fox Books and support a local business but for now, because of COVID, we’re meeting via Zoom. Our November book is the 2018 Pulitzer winning novel The Overstory by Richard Powers.

Essential Native Trees & Shrubs book coverKaren Grumbles

*Annapolis Green sells a reference book that I am planning to ask for as a Christmas gift entitled Essential Native Trees and Shrubs for Eastern U.S.: The Guide to Creating A Sustainable Landscape by Tony Dove and Ginger Woolridge!

Learn more about our book club, Annapolis Green Reads.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

bringing nature home bookcover

Annapolis Green Reads

annapolis green reads

Join the Annapolis Green environmental book club by Zoom to discuss the book, Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants by Douglas W. Tallamy.

Dr. Tallamy reveals the unbreakable link between native plant species and native wildlife. Native insects cannot, or will not, eat alien plants. When native plants disappear, the insects disappear, impoverishing the food source for birds and other animals. It will make you rethink your yard.

Questions, comments, want to join? Contact Karen Grumbles, our Green Reads leader, at greenreads@annapolisgreen.com.

Learn more.

Tags: , , , , ,

NEWSLETTER SUBSCRIPTION

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Annapolis Green

We connect, inform, and inspire Annapolis area residents, organizations, and businesses to care for the environment, live more responsibly, create a more beautiful, thriving community, and have fun!

More About Us

GuideStar Silver

Quick Links

Social Media



Proud Partner in GreenGive

PO Box 3423
Annapolis MD 21403

Phone: 410-656-9420
Email: bay@annapolisgreen.com