Tag: cafe scientifique

EV plugged in

Annapolis Green President Elvia Thompson will present a talk for Café Scientifique about electric vehicles, how they work, how their adoption reduces air pollution with resulting climate and health benefits, and how to select the right electric vehicle for you.

There's an Electric Car in Your FutureTaking steps to mitigate the effects of climate change must include reduction of emissions created by burning fossil fuels. Transportation is key to this. According to the EPA, transportation is the largest economic sector contributor to greenhouse gas emissions – 28% – in the United States. What we drive makes a difference. We can no longer afford to meet our transportation needs with gasoline, diesel and natural gas. Zero emission vehicles are now plentiful and affordable. The charging infrastructure is growing daily. Car and truck manufacturers have announced that they will be all-electric in the next couple of decades. Driving electric more than pays off in the long run.

Join Zoom Meeting:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87848406572?pwd=VVVFOVNwNFdtN1VDVDA3Sk5yc0VLdz09
Meeting ID: 878 4840 6572 Passcode: 433794
One tap mobile: +13017158592,,87848406572#,,,,*433794# US (Wash. D.C)

Information: Contact Tracy Gill at annapoliscafesci@gmail.com

cafe scientifique

Background: The first Cafés Scientifique were held in Leeds, United Kingdom in 1998. From there, cafés gradually spread. Currently, some 70-plus cafés meet regularly to hear scientists or writers on science talk about their work and discuss it with diverse audiences. Meetings would take place in cafés, bars, restaurants, and even theatres, but always outside a traditional academic context; in the COVID era, they are held virtually.

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blue crab

cafe scientifiqueAnnapolis Annapolis Cafe Scientifique presents a talk about the management of blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus, which in Chesapeake Bay took a dramatic change of course in Fall 2008. It has been largely successful, but it took 15 years to implement. When a decline in the population of blue crabs was first observed in the mid-1990s, standard management actions – size limits, effort reduction, etc. – were put in place in a piecemeal fashion by each jurisdiction without much effect.

The hydrologic and biotic characteristics of the Chesapeake Bay, which make it the world’s most productive estuary for blue crabs, create a spatial and temporal partitioning of sizes and sexes. The life cycle of the blue crab, tailored to estuaries, and how the fishery and industry developed in response to the geographic differences in blue crab distribution, were challenges that needed to be overcome.

DNR logoSpeaker Glenn Davis is a biologist with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and current chair of the Chesapeake Bay Stock Assessment Committee. He began working with blue crabs 32 years ago, at the inception of the Bay-wide blue crab winter dredge survey. He has been involved with numerous fishery-independent and fishery-dependent research and monitoring studies focusing on blue crabs.

Click here for Zoom link to join the talk.
Meeting ID: 878 4840 6572
Passcode: 433794
To join by phone: 301-715-8592, 878-484-06572

Information

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cafe scientifiqueSpeaker:Dr. Jeffrey Cornwell, Research Professor at the Horn Point Laboratory.

Decreasing the nitrogen and phosphorus inputs to the Chesapeake Bay is a key part of improving water quality, with excess inputs leading to baywide eutrophication issues include mid-bay anoxia, harmful algal blooms, and loss of submerged aquatic vegetation. For nitrogen, the implementation of advanced wastewater treatment, decreased atmospheric loading and a variety of farming best management practices are key parts of the management “tool kit.” While the interception of nitrogen (and phosphorus) prior to inputs to the bay has been effective, achieving goals can be elusive. After nitrogen input to tidal waters, there have been relatively few means to remove nitrogen from the active cycle. The presentation, will include discussion of the potential role of oyster and wetland restoration in removing nitrogen and phosphorus from the upper Chesapeake Bay. The Poplar Island wetland development and from Harris Creek oyster restoration will be used as examples.

Zoom login: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/88972124238?

Contact Tracy Gill for the meeting password

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cafe scientifique

Featured speaker: Ginger Woolridge, an Annapolis-based landscape designer, author and consultant.

Ms. Woolridge will underscore the case for planting natives and the serious threats that face them in both the planted and wild landscapes. She will review important attributes and design principles to consider when planting native trees and shrubs. Finally, she will present some of her favorite proven and attractive trees and shrubs, and their uses.

The eastern United States has a rich palette of attractive and reliable plants for almost any use. Join the talk to see how our beautiful, and tough, trees and shrubs can be used to stunning effect in our landscape projects. Even more, in our period of species loss, native plants are the foundation of a native food web.

About the Speaker: Ginger Woolridge’s particular interest is in supporting the use of native plants wherever appropriate. Woolridge is the coauthor of Essential Native Trees and Shrubs for the Eastern United States. She has a BS in Landscape Architecture from Penn State and an MBA from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.

Book available for purchase:
Essential Natives is a tool for making quick and confident native plant choices. Today, we are facing exceptional insect and bird population declines and extinctions. It has never been more important to support the plants our native fauna require. Tony Dove, coauthor, spent 20 years as a horticulturist at the Smithsonian Institution, both for the museums in Washington, DC and at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. Essential Natives was chosen for the 2018 New York Times Summer Reading List.

To join the talk, contact Tracy Gill in advance: annapoliscafesci@gmail.com

The Annapolis Cafe Scientifique (ACS) is place where you can get a coffee or a meal and learn the
about a wide variety of science topics. ACS usually hosts at 49 West restaurant in Annapolis, 10 days a year,
January-February, on the last Thursday of the month, at 6:15pm. For the time being, we will be virtual only. To join the mailing list, send an email to
annapoliscafefsci@gmail.com and put subscribe in the subject line.

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cafe scientifiqueSpeaker: Chris Eberly, Executive Director of the Maryland Bird Conservation Partnership

About the Talk: Humans utilize technology in amazing ways. GPS can help us find any place on Earth, planes take us to far away lands, and cars allow us to roam freely. Without these things we would not be able to venture far from home. Now imagine flying 3,000 miles with no rest, no refueling, and no water. Oh, and by the way, you weigh half an ounce and do this in 80 non-stop hours. The Blackpoll Warbler does this (plus an additional 4,500 miles) during its migration every fall. Technology is also helping scientists unravel the complexities of bird migration. GPS, light-level geolocators, weather surveillance radar, and nanotags are unlocking these long-held secrets. We will look at examples of amazing migrations, from raptors to shorebirds to songbirds. But along this scientific journey, we would be remiss if we did not take a step back and simply be in awe of these magnificent creatures that can inspire us even now when we are home-bound.

About the Speaker: Chris Eberly has been Executive Director of the Maryland Bird Conservation Partnership since 2017. A Marylander by birth, he worked in the computer industry for 11 years before attending graduate school at the University of Georgia and earning an M.S. in natural resources/ornithology. Following grad school he became the first coordinator of the Department of Defense’s bird conservation program (DoD Partners in Flight program), a position he held for 17 years. After serving as Executive Director of the Gulf Coast Bird Observatory in Texas, he was excited to return to Maryland to head up the Maryland Bird Conservation Partnership. Chris strives to connect people to birds through Bird City Maryland, the Maryland Bald Eagle Nest Monitoring Program, and the Farmland Raptor Program. He is also currently president of the Anne Arundel Bird Club.

To join the talk, contact Tracy Gill in advance: annapoliscafesci@gmail.com

The Annapolis Cafe Scientifique (ACS) is place where you can get a coffee or a meal and learn the
about a wide variety of science topics. ACS usually hosts at 49 West restaurant in Annapolis, 10 days a year,
January-February, on the last Thursday of the month, at 6:15pm. For the time being, we will be virtual only. To join the mailing list, send an email to
annapoliscafefsci@gmail.com and put subscribe in the subject line.

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cafe scientifique

Yes indeed, satellites flying 450 miles above us can be used to explore the microscopic ocean. “Observing the microscopic living (and non-living) ocean from space” will provide an overview of the field of satellite ocean color.  The contents of the upper ocean shape the distribution of the marine light field and give the ocean its color.  By measuring the spectral distribution of light leaving the ocean (that is, its “ocean color”), satellite radiometers can be used to infer the contents of the water column, including information useful for fisheries and watershed management and water quality monitoring. This presentation will review how ocean color works, why everyone should care about phytoplankton, and the current state-of-the-art in satellite ocean color – including a peek at NASA’s next great Earth observing mission, PACE.  It will also demystify the acquisition, use, and analysis of satellite ocean color data products.

Reserve your seat by calling 410-626-9796. If you reserve a seat and your plans change, please release your seats.

Jeremy WerdellSpeaker: Dr. Jeremy Werdell, Oceanographer in the Ocean Ecology Laboratory at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), where he also serves as the Project Scientist for the upcoming Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission.

Dr. Jeremy Werdell is an Oceanographer in the Ocean Ecology Laboratory at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), where he also serves as the Project Scientist for the upcoming Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission. Jeremy resolved to become a marine scientist in 1988 upon his return from an eighth grade science trip to the Bermuda Biological Station for Research. After a quick stint in high school, he received his B.A. in Biology and in Environmental Science from the University of Virginia in 1996 and his M.S. in Oceanography from the University of Connecticut in 1998.  Jeremy joined GSFC in 1999, where he has remained ever since, as all oceanographers with a penchant for motion sickness should. When the stars properly aligned in 2014, Jeremy received his Ph.D. from the University of Maine. His primary interest focuses on improving our understanding of the ocean’s biological responses to Earth’s changing climate – namely, how the spatial distributions of phytoplankton communities evolve over time. If one cares about breathing and eating and aquatic recreation, then one cares about phytoplankton. Given that Jeremy wears a NASA badge, his mandatory secondary interests extend to the more challenging aspects of satellite remote sensing, including the on-orbit calibration of ocean color instruments, the development of remote-sensing algorithms, and the validation of satellite-derived data products. These, in combination with his subject matter living in a three-dimensional fluid on a rotating ellipsoid, create a research environment packed with opportunities to contribute to NASA’s pursuit of better understanding our home planet. When not traveling with his family and obsessing about his yard, Jeremy also moonlights as a teacher and student mentor. If he had to do it all again, he would pursue his real dream of becoming a professional chef.

Annapolis Café Scientifique is a place where, for the price of a cup of coffee or a glass of wine, anyone can come to explore the latest ideas in science and technology.

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cafe scientifiqueAnnapolis Cafe Scientifique: A place where, for the price of a cup of coffee or a glass of wine, anyone can come to explore the latest ideas in science and technology.

Topic: Notes from the Field: Why shedding light on the secret lives of Chesapeake species is critical to fisheries management and conservation.

Speaker: Matthew Ogburn, Principal Investigator, Senior Scientist, Fish and Invertebrate Ecology, Fisheries Conservation, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center.

If you reserve seats and your plans change, please call to release your seats.

To reserve your seat, call 410-626-9796

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